Canadian marijuana legalization – Some Insights

Dating back to ancient times, marijuana has been used to aid associated discomfort of medical ailments. Until the invention of aspirin in 1897, people used medical marijuana to relieve body pain in adults as well as alleviate nausea, depression, hemorrhoids and to treat women after they gave birth.

Nowadays, it is considered a natural alternative in the treatment of certain cancers, neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s’ disease and dementia, AIDS/HIV and chronic pain associated with arthritis, injuries and premenstrual syndrome.

In the United States it is against the law to possess, sell or buy it, as it is narcotic like cocaine and heroin; thirteen states allow the sale of this with the written consent of a physician. Without a doctor’s approval, a person cannot legally receive a card issued by their state which allows them to buy it at a dispensary. Read more about the Best Online Dispensary Canada.

Dispensaries sell this in many forms such as growing seeds, food and drink products, liquid form and as a concentrated pill to be swallowed. Some of these even have a special area to consume the product or offer child care during a patient visit. Patients who buy it for legitimate health reasons can get it at any legal dispensary or clinic permitted by their state to sell only to those with a medical card.

Recently President Obama passed a policy to not charge patients who comply with state laws. In a recent interview, he stated that health care reform and other issues were of greater priority.

For nausea and pain control, some people have been able to use self-hypnosis successfully to help mitigate symptoms. It is best to study with a trained and certified professional if you decide to go this route.

Major Elements In Canadian marijuana legalization

Marijuana, cannabis, marijuana, pot, weed – no matter what it is called, marijuana has been demonized for years as being an evil drug. Despite positive research from institutes of study in many countries, medical marijuana (not to be confused with cannabis for recreational use) is still a matter of strong debate. Oddly enough, the debate is hottest not between the general citizens of a country, but between the medical community and the respective governments.

In places where using medical marijuana is legal, studies are ongoing and often produce results that surprise many in the medical community. Others feel the results only serve to enforce the belief that marijuana is not the demon plant propaganda has said it is.

Canadians and Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (related to Crohn’s disease) are serious problems for more over 170,000 Canadians. In fact, Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world. Sufferers may have persistent diarrhea, fever, cramping and abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding. Many lose their appetite, which can cause unhealthy weight loss, while some are plagued by nausea and vomiting. Crohn’s disease can affect the joints, liver, skin and eyes, as well, and commonly causes great fatigue.

Crohn’s disease is chronic; periods of remission are mixed with periods of intense activeness. Unfortunately, the medical community has been unable to find the cause of this disease, although they believe it has to do with an overactive immune system, initially triggered by outside influences. The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) states:

“Many scientists now believe that the interaction of an outside agent (such as a virus or bacterium) with the body’s immune system may trigger the disease, or that such an agent may cause damage to the intestinal wall, initiating or accelerating the disease process.”

They further state that, “Because there is no cure for Crohn’s disease, the goal of medical treatment is to suppress the inflammatory response. This step accomplishes two important goals: It allows the intestinal tissue to heal and it also relieves the symptoms of fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Once the symptoms are brought under control (this is known as inducing remission), medical therapy is used to decrease the frequency of disease flares (this is known as maintaining remission, or maintenance).” – CCFA

Medicinal Therapy for Crohn’s Disease

Much of the traditional medication (the medical therapy mentioned by CCFA) used to treat Crohn’s disease includes a mixture of anti-inflammatory, antibodies, immune modifiers/suppressants and corticosteroids. Indeed, traditional medical treatments become a cornucopia of pharmaceutical concoctions.

As with most man-made medicinal products, each treatment also causes its own symptoms. For instance, the immunosuppressive medicines can cause nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea and vomiting. Steroids also cause these symptoms, with the addition of anxiety and depression, as well as bone thinning, peptic ulcers and other issues with prolonged usage.

A Guide to Canadian marijuana legalization

On July 30, 2001, the ‘Narcotic Control Regulation’ was amended and the ‘Marijuana Medical Access Regulation’ came into force. This sparked the beginning of a heated national debate, the subject in question being the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes in Canada. While marijuana is still considered an illegal substance in Canada, it is approved for use under certain circumstances. It is available for applicants who have a terminal illness with a prognosis of a life span of less than 12 months, those who suffer from specific symptoms associated with certain serious medical conditions, or those who have symptoms associated with a serious medical circumstance, where conventional treatments have failed to relieve symptoms (Health Canada, “Medical Marijuana”).

Due to previous stigmatizations associated with marijuana use, as well as its previous legal implications, public favor was not in support for the recent Bill C-17; a Bill for cannabis law reform in Canada, which was passed on November 1, 2004. The legislation allows a person to have up to 30 grams of marijuana in their possession, within limitations, while only receiving a fine (Canadian Foundation for Drug Policy, “Cannabis Law Reform in Canada”). This Act is the closest the Canadian government has ever before come toward legalizing marijuana. It is becoming increasingly apparent that through Bill C-17, there will be potentially beneficial monetary implications for the federal government, false social perceptions will lessen, and medical benefits of cannabis use will become further appreciated. In the future, marijuana use will not be perceived as the social ‘evil’ it once was, or still is. In light of the following information, it will become clear that it is not necessary to prohibit marijuana use, but rather to regulate it.

To drug policy reformers, prohibition of marijuana is not just a cause to be supported, but a mandatory way of life, necessary to uphold society’s moral fiber. These activists do not consider marijuana to be safe. Even when scientific information supports the lack of harmful effects of cannabis on the body; many still categorize it with dangerous substances such as cocaine or heroin. It is these ‘marijuana myths’ that continue to influence the opinions of so many Canadian citizens, even though there is a lack of fact-driven information to support common social stigma.

A widespread belief amongst the public is that marijuana is a ‘gateway drug’, leading to the use of more harmful substances. Never has there been a consistent relationship between the use patterns of various drugs. While marijuana use has fluctuated over the years, harder, more addictive drug use, such as LSD, remains the same. In fact, in 1999 less than 16% of high school students who smoked marijuana report trying cocaine (qtd. in Zimmer, 2). Another frequent misconception is that high levels of marijuana use can be profoundly addicting. While lab rats that are injected with THC and then given a cannabinoid receptor-blocker do experience some withdrawal symptoms, such as disturbed sleep and loss of appetite, humans are never given ‘blockers’. THC slowly leaves the human system, causing no serious withdrawal (Zimmer et al. 47). A study such as this is not relevant to physical addiction in humans.